jazz musician

Trumpeter Wayne Tucker in his Crown Heights creative space by annaandthelens

A few months ago, I had the pleasure to photograph trumpeter Wayne Tucker in his Crown Heights apartment that he shares with four other musicians. We began by talking in his living room. There in the middle of the room, Wayne conducts his daily practice, a combination of meditative breathing and trumpet playing. Closing his eyes, he counts to 10 in his head and clears his mind of everything except the even nature of his breath. He holds each note as long as possible while trying to maintain the same intensity. This practice allows him to channel all of his energy into his playing, a technique he later uses when he's onstage. When performing, he listens to the energy of the room and tries to concentrate on it, focuses all his effort on the energy coming out of him and into the audience.

Wayne comes from a family of musicians; his father, a piano player, was the main influencer of his musical taste, exposing him to funk, soul and r&b from an early age. Naturally, Wayne's first instrument was the piano, then he learned to play the violin, and finally the trumpet. His older brother (who is one of the four musicians he currently shares an apartment with), plays the tenor sax. In fact, it was after his brother began playing the saxophone, that Wayne picked up the trumpet. He grew up with a built in band at home, often jamming and experimenting from a young age.

Wayne spent a long time studying the technicalities and the math behind the music, including the patterns and permutations, to the point that it can become instinctual, allowing him to focus on evoking the feeling behind the music. In high school, he was part of an orchestra, which allowed him to understand composition and gave him an ability to hear all the elements in a song. That experience fueled his musical passion, the search for beautiful harmonies.

His latest album "Wake Up and See the Sun" (released this September), is about appreciating what one has in life. He is drawn to using music as a vehicle to transport the listener to a specific place or feeling. A way to share his world with others. Many of the songs on the record had been written years ago, but he wanted to take the opportunity to explore them musically, incorporating different instrumentations and sounds to create an eclectic sound quilt for the listener.

When I asked Wayne how he composes songs, he shared that it always starts with the piano, and as the song builds, he finds the natural moments where the trumpet can come in.  So we went downstairs, to his roommate's (David Linard) room where there is a stand up piano. While his roommate was packing to go to rehearsal, Wayne started fiddling with the keys, experimenting with a progression of notes he played over and over. I asked him what he was thinking of as he was doing this, and he said it reminded him of being in church. The first time the pastor says "Jesus"  it doesn't really have much of an effect on you, but slowly as he repeats the name over and over, the word starts to take on a meaning. So do the progression of notes as he plays them over and over, until a melody begins to emerge...

Explore Wayne Tucker's music: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wayne.tucker.73 Spotify: Spotify IG: @wayneeverest

Multi-instrumentalist Clark Gayton in his creative space in South Bronx by annaandthelens

Anyone who knows Clark always describes him as a NY legend, and it's no wonder. He's been living in NY for over 30 years and is considered one of the finest musicians and has been playing with some of the most renowned musicians for decades. Clark lives in an apartment that is located in a converted piano factory. The area of the Bronx that he lives in, Mott Haven, used to be a hub for piano factories.

In his sun-drenched and open space, he has instruments laid out all around. Varieties of horns, tubas, trombones, a sousaphone, as well as pianos, bass guitar, and so many others, all within easy reach.  He picks up an instrument depending on what mood he is in and walks around his apartment playing it. The tuba he turns to when he wants to feel better, he says something about the act of playing it is soothing.

We spoke about how he started playing and composing music and he shared that his first instrument was the tuba. He began playing in his school band when he was 12 years old and at his teacher’s encouragement, he composed his first song that same year. Later, also at his teacher's encouragement,  the band perform his composition. It was the first time he got to hear his own composition and he was surprised at which parts worked and which mistakes actually sounded better than the originals he wrote.

Nowadays, he composes songs in pieces, keeping a stash of ideas that he turns to later on. Sometimes his get inspired from hearing songs on the street. It could be two different songs with different rhythms and melodies playing at the same time, one from a bodega and the other from a car; the blending of sounds breathes life to a new song idea. NYC noise suddenly becomes ripe with inspiration.

Explore Clark Gayton’s music: Website: Clark Gayton FB: Clark Gayton